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Sunday 24th January 2021 – Family Zoom Service led by Canon Richard Osborn.

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A real pleasure to have Richard lead our worship this week. Richard first came to us 15 years ago (he says) in a pulpit exchange as part for the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity – and once we get our hooks into somebody…………………. anyway, no regrets on either side!

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Richard told us that the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity is timed to fit between the feast date for St Peter and the date, a week later, of Paul’s conversion on the road to Damascus – though he noted that even these two didn’t always see eye to eye on religious matters.

He believes that Prayers for Unity are still relevant today as we’ve not achieved the unity that Jesus would wish of us. Joe Biden in his inauguration speech (addressing another example of disunity) said that the answer was not to turn inwards; instead to open our souls instead of hardening our hearts; to show tolerance and humility and be willing to stand in the other person’s shoes.

And our unity would be noted by others.

The Wedding in Cana – John 2 vv 1-11

We may be surprised and questioning why Jesus’s first miracle was the production of fine wine – and bucketfulls of it! (600 litres according to our GNB).

Well one explanation might be that he wanted us to know that God’s kingdom is a joyous place?

Richard’s insights focused on the six stone water jars, part of the Jewish rights of purification. Although brought up as a devout Jew, by Jesus’s time the religion had become obsessed with minor detail, ceremony and enrichment: the old ways needed to be renewed and transformed, just as the water was transformed into wine. A religion of law and ceremonial was to be replaced by one of spirit and love.

For those in the know, the miracle revealed the glory of God and switched a focus on Temple and God’s creation to one on the person of Jesus as the Son of God.

And the links to the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity?

Richard saw this in the need for a transformation of our relationships with each other; to work alongside other Christians to find new ways to extend God’s Kingdom in a post-Covid world.

And whilst keeping the best wine ‘til last – our unity in heaven – to do everything possible to achieve this now on earth as well.

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Sunday 17th January 2021 – Family Zoom Communion Service led by Revd. David Aplin.

This was another “Plan C” week for David who stood in for both Tonys as they were unable to lead our worship.

Building on last week David spoke once again about coming to the Lord quietly and gently. He felt himself held lovingly in God’s hands.

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When we see the size and scale of the universe that God has created, we realise that He is completely beyond our understanding. As we look out through our telescopes, or in through our microscopes, we see both structure and complexity in all parts of creation.

With so many stars and planets it is likely that earth is not the only planet on which life exists. How then should we then understand ourselves as being the high point of creation, created in God’s image as the Bible tells us?

I listened and thought “perhaps a high point in an ongoing creative process, but there will be other high points and they may not look at all like us”. Perhaps what would link us is our intelligence, our sense of good and evil and an increasing understanding and power to decide and to act. In this, as David said, we would share in the Godhead. And if God loves and cares for each one of us and holds them as David did his teddy – that’s enough to know.

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The reading 1 Samuel 3, vv 1-10 dealt with that moment in Samuel’s life when through the working of the Holy Spirit he became aware of God’s presence. His response, “Speak Lord, your servant is listening”.

God is calling us, even those who do not know him. And if we listen, God can do great things through us.

David’s Bible is inscribed with the words from Corinthians “we are Christ’s Ambassadors”.

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David encourages us to let the joy of knowing God shine through in or lives, so that when we go out into our community, people see we have something they would like to share. He knows it is not enough just to keep our church going for the next ten or so years – the church must survive and thrive for Christ.

And that is a message for each and every one of us.

Sunday 10th January 2021 – Family Zoom Service led by Revd. David Aplin.

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David shared with us his thoughts about Baptism and the events surrounding Jesus’s Baptism by John in the River Jordan.

He noted that there is confusion about the significance of both Baptism and the christening of children amongst the different branches of our Christian faith. The age at which people are baptised or confirmed is certainly an issue: there are those who believe it should only take place when the person involved is mature enough to understand and take on the commitment involved.

David reminded us that at our URC Christenings, the threefold commitments – by parents, godparents and the church community to nurture and support a growing life in faith – was fundamental to our approach. Not said, but perhaps implicit, is that for all of us on our spiritual journeys, the support of family and those in our worshipping community and the ability to talk about our beliefs and doubts is so valuable for all of us – particularly when our faith and beliefs are under challenge from what life is throwing at us.

Mark 1 vv 9-11 recounts that moment in time when Jesus was Baptised by John – probably the most life-changing moment in his life, and essentially the moment at which Mark takes up the story of Jesus’s life.

Such was the impact of that moment that Jesus took some considerable time alone in the desert coming to terms with it and reshaping his future life down the pathway we are so familiar with. We can’t claim this was a “one-off” happening: the Bible tells us that Paul experienced something similar as did Mohammed and they too reacted quite similarly. *

For those of us who have not had such an experience – an intense and deep moment of communion with our creator – our faith and belief has a more nuanced well-spring.

David has previously told us of his own intense experience in 1988 and gave us more detail of about it, how he came to terms with it, and the impact it had on his life.

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He doesn’t think he was particularly special or worthy – perhaps more that he needed that “kick up the pants”. He had to take time to work through it all to find the humility he needed for his future work.

The Holy Spirit doesn’t necessarily descend on us at Baptism, sometimes it can happen before and sometimes it comes  much later – when we are ready to accept it.

David believes God’s words to Jesus at his Baptism are also words for us – that through the Spirit we are all his sons and daughters who he loves. We don’t need to have received the Spirit in such a dramatic way. Many will have received the Spirit almost imperceptibly, day by day, going through their lives, something that can come gradually and that we then live out through our lives.

*This comment is not to equate the experiences, only to observe that they are part of the human condition in relation to our creator.

Sunday 3rd January 2021 – Family Communion Service led by Revd. John Mackerness

John Mackerness led our first 2021 Service – a Zoom-only Communion Service in view of rising Covid-19 infections in our area.

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John noted that Jesus had shared meals in all kinds of places and with all kinds of people. We might be used to celebrating Holy Communion in a more formal setting, but it all began in the ordinary places where people lived, surrounded by the clutter of daily living (so no change there?).

And he had a rather fine piece of rye bread to break and a good glass of wine to drink when the time came.

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John, as a chaplain at Heathrow knows all about people travelling, so best able to tell us about the “Three Kings”.

Well firstly there might have been up to 12 of them – kings, magi, wise men, astrologers, astronomers – certainly they were gentiles. There might have been more gifts, but the three important ones were gold, for a king; frankincense, for remembrances; and myrrh for death.

They were looking for a king in a palace and were surprised where they found Jesus. We also need to look beyond the expected places for the opportunities that God has for us.

Journeys today are generally easier than in those times. Joseph, Mary and the baby Jesus were refugees – from war in Nazareth as Mike Findley told us and later from Herod and the slaughter of the innocents.

The Magi were also on a spiritual journey and were much changed and deeply troubled by their encounter. We are on a spiritual journey, even if we don’t always recognise it.  We’ve no personal spiritual SatNav and can easily get lost or go off track. But then God can call us, to get us on track.

We are now in a New Year and uncertain what it will bring but can be confident that God and Jesus will watch over us. And if we don’t have gold, frankincense or myrrh to bring, we can bring ourselves. God will equip us and use us.

So rather than asking for a light to find our way we should put our hand in the hand of God, stepping out into the New Year with confidence. And on our spiritual journey, “seek and you will find”.

Sunday 27th December – Family Service led by Anne Walton

We were so relieved to hear that Tony Alderman is now out of intensive care and recovering -albeit slowly – and thankful to Anne for stepping into the breach and leading our worship.

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We started with a YouTube track featuring Stephen’s choir, the Aeolian Singers and Peter Skellern in a performance of his song ‘Waiting for the Word’. It was a fitting opener for the reading, Luke 2 vv 22-40, ‘Jesus is Presented in the Temple’.  

Anne’s Sermon “Is it OK to doubt” picked out from the reading the two elderly people in the Temple who had been waiting for so long for a Messiah to come and set Jerusalem free. They must have had doubts during their long wait. The Bible is full of doubters – starting with Adam – and doubt is a part of the human condition.

But is it a good thing? Anne says yes – we can’t grow unless we doubt. We need the challenge of curiosity and doubt to progress. So we should celebrate and embrace our doubts which give us the potential to grow.

Many of us worry less about doubts than about what we are going to do with them. Anne encourages us to embrace our doubts and work through them. Doubts can be a prelude to great faith.

And don’t forget that even Jesus had doubts – “My god, my God, why did you abandon me?”

Faith and hope are both belief tinged with doubt and doubt is the front door to faith.

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After the Service tony shared with us some pictures of the children’s party in Uganda to which we had made a contribution.

Friday 25th December – Christmas Day Service led by Revd. David Aplin.

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We were glad to see so many log ins to our Christmas Day Service – especially those juggling the preparation of Christmas Dinner with listening to the Zoom Service. We should thank God for multi-tasking (even if this time the men missed out)?.

A special thank you as well to David, who offered us a very personal perspective on the events surrounding Christmas – taking the accounts from the Gospels at their face values and convinced of the truth of it all.

If last week Mike Findley wanted to home in on the fundamentals and tomorrow (Sunday 27th) Anne’s Sermon is entitled “Is it OK to doubt”; recognising the importance of Christmas and the challenge it represents to us today is something I think all three will agree on.

David sees the Holy Spirit being active throughout creation and active today in all our lives – most certainly in his. The challenge is to recognise that the Spirit is working in our lives – a power beyond our understanding. Do we trust in the Holy Spirit and take up the opportunities it offers us? Some of these will be tough, but we will be supported by the Spirit. Through our faith we will grow in understanding and also grow closer to God.

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Sunday 20th December – Communion Service led by Mike Findley.

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A real pleasure to welcome Mike Findley back to lead our Communion Service from the church.

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Mike told us of his certain sense of disappointment with Christmas – too full of story and not enough meaning – in that the real importance gets lost in a wave of traditional practices and celebrations. He noted that in the reading (Luke 2 vv 1-7) – a bit like in “The Crown” on Netflix – Luke doesn’t always let the facts get in the way of a good story.

Instead, Mike asked us to focus on the drama of a young girl, having left her home in a war zone, frightened, heavily pregnant, with nowhere proper to stay, giving birth in the most rudimentary circumstances at a time when many women were dying in childbirth.

Somehow, she managed it; one of the many Biblical examples of God taking the initiative to help the world He loved and mankind get back on track. His solution started with a baby, God living with us, God sharing our lives. This story of a new life, a new creation and a new start was both a story and a challenge for us. Will we let God be with us, let God into us?

It requires a response from us all.

2 Corinthians 5 vv 17-20, tells us that anyone being joined to Christ is a new being. Mike felt that much that we do in our lives is an attempt to reconcile God to us. But God is already reconciled to us and loves us unconditionally. He loves what he has created and wants to get his people back. It is we that erect the barriers.

We need to open up to God, accept new life and become a new creation.

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“Don’t push God into the stable of your life” – keep him at the centre!

Sunday 13th December – Family Service led by Anne Walton

Well, this week the internet access didn’t fail us, but we had Anne at home (with her Christmas jumper and finely crafted backdrop), our church Secretary and the Bible readers in church, and our Director of Music off with his City Chamber Choir performing the Carol Concert that they will be bringing to us this Wednesday (16th December). So it was “virtual Stephen” playing and singing for us today!

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So we had a bit more complexity than usual, but it does show just how flexible our hybrid Church/Zoom Service format has allowed us to become.

Some of us look out from the comfort of our homes – others look…….well I’ll leave it to you to decide (but it is great to see people back worshipping in our church).

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It was also a very nice touch to have a photo of Ken and Lilla Smithson with our Advent Candles. Ken died recently and his funeral is tomorrow (14th December). We hold them both very dearly in our hearts.

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Anne’s Reflection and Sermon were indeed a reflective look at Exodus 3 v 1-14 and John 1 v 6-8 & 19-28.

In the first reading, with God telling Moses to lead his people out of Egypt and Moses asking for a bit of ‘backup’, Anne honed in on what she felt was the intensely personal interaction between Moses and his God (who is “I AM” , “I am who I am”, or “I will be who I will be” ). Like Moses, we cannot understand what God is – though we are encouraged to strive towards a better understanding – but the relationship is personal: He will be with us, but for each of us in a unique way that reflects our needs.

In John, the theme was “I am NOT”. John was being questioned by the Jewish authorities about who he was. His answers were about who he was not. And yet as the messenger who came before he was seen by Jesus as the most important man ever.  John was not concerned with his own importance, what was important was the message. Anne suggested this should apply for us also.

Sunday 6th December – Plan C – led by Revd. David Aplin

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Well we might have wondered how the Zoom members of our community would cope if the internet link from the church wet down. Today we found out.

 John Wainwright led worship in the church and we at home had the pleasure of experiencing David Aplin – with no prior warning – leading worship for our Zoom community. We were able to follow John’s Order of Service, but the prayers, the sermon and our Communion were provided for us without preparation by David – a measure of the true professional he is. We were all truly grateful!

(Probably the only one disappointed was David’s dog, who missed out on his share of the usual ginger biscuit at communion – David used bread this time because he was leading communion)

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We had a thoughtful and challenging sermon on John the Baptist. David went to the heart of a current day issue – does a loving God really sort the wheat from the chaff or forgive everyone?

David takes the word in the Bible at face value, even if he’s less sure about the fate of the chaff. Being condemned to an eternity cut off from God would certainly be enough of a form of Hell for him. So faith, a belief in God and Jesus and true repentance are for him (as promised) the way to heaven and eternal life. And the task for us is not only to prepare ourselves, but to spread the word to others.

David was critical of church leaders who are so reluctant to defend their faith in a multi-faith world. Perhaps they sense that in this world there may be more than one way to God and the issue is not to challenge the other faiths, but to ensure that everybody is on one of these paths.

We have chosen our path and there are many around us who perhaps have not yet understood the need to be on one – a fertile field for action?

After the Service in our chat session we were able to see Nora Richardson (in a gazebo outside her care home – with Nigel and Caroline Wick) – a great pleasure for us all.

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Meanwhile at the Church, John Wainwright took the planned Toy Service with music supplied from our CD collection. Tony reported it was also a great service.

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Family Zoom Service – 29th November – led by Lilian Evans

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It being the first Sunday of Advent, Lilian’s theme was about Hope. Although we tend to focus on the coming celebration of Jesus’s birth, Advent was also about the Second Coming.

Three Bible readings gave us vignettes on Advent;

  • in Corinthians the grace and peace of a society in expectation of an imminent coming,
  • in Mark, Jesus’s description of what we would experience in the hours before he returned – and that was going to be soon – so be alert!
  • In Isaiah, frustration that God had abandoned his people because of their sins and a plea to Him to be merciful.

Hope about the Second Coming – tinged with impatience perhaps. Hope that Jesus will come despite the way we disappoint him. The early Christians had been told the Second Coming was imminent and many shared everything they had with the groups in which they lived. Even Paul felt that there were many things from normal life that were no longer important (like marriage) though he still encouraged people to get on with living and serving God’s purpose by growing his kingdom.

Looking on two thousand years later, Jesus’s reported belief in the imminence of his Second Coming is one of many challenges the Bible throws at us. Lilian’s recital of the Nicaean Creed brought back (for me) the many discussions we have had about the realities of resurrection and eternal life, which none of us could visualise. Difficult to believe in something you cannot conceive of. Hope – belief, tinged with doubt – is perhaps the better description, and as Lilian said we hope that Jesus will come again, gather up his people and take them home to a place where everything will be put right.

Family Zoom Service – 22nd November – led by Revd. John Mackerness

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John is a member of the multi-faith Chaplaincy team at Heathrow and the airport is coming to terms with much reduced throughput and an expectation that things won’t really get back to normal until 2025. Lots of job losses and worried people to care for.

In John’s sermon, based on Matthew 25 “The Final Judgement”, he noted that the judgement was not based on how faithful people were or how they worshipped but whether they were compassionate.  He felt that many faiths incorporated an essential trait of humanity – to be compassionate – to respond with help to those in need and not ignore them.

To help people you first had to listen to them to find out what they really needed: sometimes just listening was sufficient. Those in Matthew were outcasts and what mattered was to treat them like human beings and not to judge them.

He acknowledged that helping can make us vulnerable and put us at risk. In his role, he routinely makes risk assessments and is sometimes questions whether some people are really in need. He has found that in many churches it is not the Elders or specially chosen people but ordinary people who feel called by God to help people by word, deed, and prayer. All those who care help put the church at the centre of the community, with Christ at its head.

John feels that there is something of both the sheep and the goat in all of us. So as one who has always wondered what God has against goats – much more intelligent and independent than sheep – John’s view that even goats can be redeemed by loving God is a comfort. There is still time to change!

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Zoom Communion Service – 15th November – led by Revd. David Aplin

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When David told us on Friday evening he was going to wear his Pilots hat, I think we had visions of the Virgin adverts with a couple of gorgeous blonds on either side of a handsome pilot captain – but it was not to be.

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David wore his Pilots cap as a badge of honour for many years involvement with the youth group at his church in Borehamwood. That URC church may have fused with another, but the youth group continues to operate in the local Baptist church. Pilots had provided David with many hours of stimulating involvement – not least in preparing the religious elements of each session’s proceedings.

His thoughts on the Bible Reading, Matthew 25 vv 14-30 – The Parable of the Talents in the NIV – were very much about our talents – gifts from God – and how we should use them in our lives. He believes that when life returns more to normal (post-Covid) there will be a great appetite for communal activities – including worship. We should be using our talents (and our golden coins too?) to plan for the renewal of our church when that time comes.

Zoom Remembrance  Service – 8th November – led by Martyn Macphee

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A thoughtful and quietly emotional Remembrance Service. We all stood in silence for 2 minutes at home at 11.00 remembering the sacrifice of the fallen.

The Lectionary Reading (Matthew 25, vv 1-13 – The Parable of the Ten Young Women) might have seemed a little out of place for a Remembrance Service, but being spiritually prepared for death – as for the Second Coming – was important for many soldiers in the trenches, as their conversations with their chaplains testified. And none could know the time of their death just as we cannot know when Jesus will come again.

The Parable drew strongly on wedding customs of the Middle East, still widely practiced today. Not knowing the time of the wedding required forethought and preparation (in terms of containers with extra lamp oil). If that is the message for us as well, the idea that not being ready at the time of the Second Coming – a time for repentance and a time when it is too late! –  will see us shut out of heaven permanently does not fit easily with our belief in a loving and forgiving God – but as we have heard on many occasions it’s one of those things we’ll only find out for sure when it happens!

Being ready spiritually for the Second Coming as for our own deaths requires preparation. Martyn told us this was not a ‘box ticking’ or ‘ jumping through hoops’ exercise. Rather we needed to accept and believe what Jesus has done for us and let him set the direction of our lives. 

Family Church & Zoom communion Service – 1st November – led by Mike Findley

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A very thought-provoking address from Mike at a time when we are about to go into lockdown again and will not be able (or so it appears at the moment) to worship in church for a number of weeks.

In the readings – Micah 3: vv 5-12 and Matthew 23: vv 1-12, Micah and Jesus were both critical of the behaviour of the leaders of the time – prophets and Pharisees in the two readings. Each reading had been “edited” later with the benefit of hindsight. Micah reflected on the loss of the Jewish homeland and exile to Babylon. Matthew was written at a time when the Christian church in Jerusalem was at odds with a Pharisee teaching centre on the coast

The edited messages included examples of ’wrong theology’. The Jewish kingdoms were rich and powerful at times when they worshipped a number of gods, including Baal. Invasion and loss of their lands came at a time when a particularly devout king ruled. Quite a few Pharisees were also critical of the behaviour of some of their members.

Put aside the negative criticism and another theme emerged, that of the behaviour expected of those who would lead by example – to be humble, to serve, to walk with God – and not to look for praise or even for acknowledgement of their works. This for Mike applies equally for us.

So a saint is someone who seeks out the opportunities to serve, doesn’t show off or look to be greeted in the street as if important.

We should not expect to be favoured, to be spared getting the coronavirus or becoming unemployed because of our beliefs. God has a purpose for us and will help us fulfil that purpose.

We should not lose hope or feel depressed, ‘New Normal” will be different and there will be no going back. We are all likely to live a more distributed lifestyle. We should pray for God to put his hands around us and enable us to withstand whatever happens to us. As we seek opportunities to serve, people will see we are coping and ask why this is. Walking with God, we show strength and calmness as we face the future. Maybe others will want this too?

Family Zoom & Church Service – 25th October – led by Revd. David Aplin

We were grateful to David for leading our worship despite the crises that he faced within his family circle – some of which he shared with us during the Service.

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David is marked by his real-life experiences which for him underpin his unswerving belief in the power of God, his existence as a person, his love for us and the certainty of resurrection. This came over in his Talk and his Sermon, which was on Matthew 22, vv 34-40.

David expressed sympathy for the way the press hounded our politicians daily, drawing a parallel to the challenges Jesus faced, without perhaps mentioning that Jesus’s preaching represented a more profound “turning on its head” of Jewish religious beliefs than anything our politicians get up to today.

So an attack and an attempt to trap Jesus with a question by a ‘teacher of the Law’ was perhaps unsurprising, but elicited an answer about “the greatest commandment” that is as much a challenge to us today as it was to the Pharisees then.

David recognised the difficulty that many have in “loving Lord God with all your heart, soul and mind” because their understanding of what God is is nebulous. Loving neighbours as we love ourselves is a much easier concept – albeit not always an easy one to follow – because neighbours are people like us. We know what we are dealing with.

So his strong belief, supported by real life experience, in God as a loving person, ready to help us and overlook our warts is for David the starting point and the key to fulfilling The Greatest Commandment.

Family Zoom & Church Communion Service – 18th October – led by Anne Walton

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Some nice touches from Anne this week – lighting 10 candles during the prayers of intercession (and holding them up to the camera!). 

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Also introducing some sung refrains during the Communion Liturgy. Both were implemented seamlessly and added to another excellent Service from Anne.

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Anne’s Sermon was a reflection on Matthew 22 vv 15-22 – ‘The Question about paying taxes’. Although intended as a trick question – and one that got an even trickier answer that confounded the Pharisees – it challenges us by suggesting that there is a clear divide between the spiritual and the temporal. The reality is somewhat different and possibly the real challenge for us is to navigate that fine line where they meet.

Family Church and Zoom service – 11th October – led by Canon Richard Osborn

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Well it was not a normal service by any means! Just as we are getting used to Services back in the church and refining the way we do things in the hybrid “Church/Zoom” world, we had a loss of power to a part of Potters Bar, so the internet of our Music/Hymn provider and our Bible reader went down for pretty well the whole of the Service.

Richard Osborn valiantly offered to sing the hymns for us – we all knew he has a great singing voice – so we could preserve the usual format, albeit without the pleasure of the usual musical introduction and finale. Our sincere thanks to Richard – a real trouper!

Richard reflected on aspects of ‘New Normal’ following a trip into London (He had felt almost as excited as his first trip on the Underground as a child) and how we all had to come to terms with it. We should not forget that God is with us especially in these times.

Richard’s sermon looked mainly at our second reading, Matthew 22 vv 1-14, one of a series of parables about the Kingdom of Heaven. He noted the poor industrial relations tactics in ‘The Workers in the vineyard’ and the seemingly unfair treatment of a guest in ‘The parable of the Wedding Feast’ who had come off the street without his wedding clothes. “The last will be first, and those who are first will be last” and “Many are invited, but few are chosen” are hard rules to interpret, particularly for God who we perceive as loving and ready to forgive, opening the Kingdom potentially to all.

Richard’s interpretation is that whilst open to all, we all have a responsibility to look into our hearts and do our best to follow God’s laws. As for not being chosen, this was hard for us to square with our understanding of a loving and compassionate God, but this was something we would only find out when the time came.

For the writer, perhaps a slightly different ‘take’. It is that our behaviours that cut us off from God; the door is always open, but we feel unable to enter. Until we change our behaviour and so feel able to enter, we are cut off from God, the Kingdom and everyone in our lives who we have loved. This Isolation in itself must be hell. But there must always be the chance to change and repent, however late we may opt to do this.

Harvest Festival and Communion Zoom Service – 4th October – led by Lilian Evans.

This was our first Service with the church open for worship and 10 people came to the Service in the church, with about 20 people following the Service at home on Zoom. All the Zoom attendees could be seen on a television screen in the church and the sung Hymns were also provided by Stephen Jones from home. A traditional Harvest arrangement in the church had been prepared by Albert Waite.

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The readings from Isiah 5 and Matthew 21 both dealt with vineyards and harvests.

We are used to the serial misbehaviour of the Jews in the Old Testament, and Isaiah used the example of the likely fate of vines in a vineyard which produced only wild and sour grapes to remind them that they, the people of Judah, were the vines in the vineyard of the Lord and they were not doing what he expected of them!

In Matthew, Jesus took a slightly different slant on the vineyard theme. In his case the landowner lets his vineyard to tenants who when the time comes refuse to hand over the agreed share of the harvest and mistreat and kill the landowner’s servants. When the landowner sends his son – to whom he believes the tenants will show respect – they kill him as well. Jesus asks what the people think the landowner will do. The chief priests and the Pharisees knew they were the subject of the parable and wanted to arrest him but were held back by their fear of the crowds.

Lilian wondered what God sees when he looks at us – does he see what he expects: are we going to bear fruit?  Are we giving back to God he things that belong to him?

Like the vineyard owner God has sent his son to us. Do we respect him and follow his guidance. On the face of it he made it easy for us, sweeping away so many of he rules that Jews had to follow. But loving God and loving our neighbours -perhaps not so easy? Lilian shared with us her experiences and the insights that guide her life. And she suggested we ask ourselves “Is there anything more we could do?”

Family Zoom Service – 27th September – led by Martyn Macphee.

Today we welcomed Martyn Macphee to lead our worship. Martyn may be a new face for some of us, but he has led our worship on at least one occasion over the years. A serious face, difficult for the camera to capture, but powerful and thought-provoking words in his prayers and address.

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Martyn and Frank Palmer took us one stage further in our process of bringing worship back into our church and could talk directly to the handful of members who had come into the church to worship and attend the Church Meeting that followed. We formally re-open for worship next week.

Martyn’s address gave us his reflections on the third reading, Matthew 21 vv 23-32 – the Question about Jesus’ authority, and the Parable of the Two Sons. Jesus’ words and actions were a challenge to the whole edifice of religious practices that grown up and stood in the way of the path to God, so his authority to do this was challenged. The ‘country boy’ outsmarted the chief priests and elders with a question they could not answer. At the core was the question of whether he was indeed the Messiah and so entitled to overrule the Church leaders of the day.

The Parable of the Two Sons was a rebuke aimed at those who by following all the complex rituals that had grown up felt they were beyond reproach had no need to repent. People who knew they were sinful heeded the calls to repent from John the Baptist and Jesus and would enter the Kingdom of God ahead of the others.

There was a clear message to us about how we saw ourselves. Would we recognise our weaknesses, open our hearts to repentance and change and through Jesus come closer to God?

Zoom Communion service – 20th September – led by Anne Walton

Zoom Communion Service – 6th September – led by John Wainwright.

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We were pleased to welcome John Wainwright back again to lead our worship. We had hoped that John could stream from the church, but we had some problems with Zoom “dropping out” during the week and decided to opt for caution, so John was at home. Tony Corfe was alone in the church from where he gave the welcome and read one of the Bible passages.

The reading was Ezekiel 37 vv 1-14 – The Valley of Dry Bones – about God breathing renewed life into dry bones as a metaphor for restoration and renewal of a Jewish community in exile in Babylon. John felt that that there was a message for us, self-isolated and possible a little downcast as a result of the Coronavirus, to look to God for strength, hope and renewed vigour when we are able to come together physically to worship.

The latest figures for Coronavirus cases suggest we may have to wait some time for this. 

Family Zoom service – 30th August – led by Anne Walton.

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Anne’s themes this week were “Post Lockdown Church” and “Singing in worship and evangelism”. The first -accompanied by a humorous video clip from Bethany Baptist Church – was appropriate for the day we had our first short video stream from the church. Frank welcomed us, gave us the notices and lit the candle in front of a webcam in the church. Great to see it again and experience the special quality of the sound from the Sanctuary.

For Anne, singing is a vital and integral part of any Service and the ability to sing at home to the music and vocals from Stephen and Paula has been one of the big plusses of a Zoom Service – and one we will hang on to (at least for those at home) when we stream Zoom Services from the church. The reading, Psalm 96, tells us to sing a song to the Lord, but also that the earth and sky will be glad and the trees and woods will shout for joy when the Lord comes.

We are singing to God, but also to our neighbours and to the world and our hymns give us the words and the courage to go out and share our faith in the wider community.

Family Zoom Service – 23rd August – lead by Revd. David Aplin.

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David was fresh back from his golden Wedding celebration in Devon and full of the joys of being physically with family and friends. He was looking forward with a similar sentiment to the planned restarting of Services in our church in September.

A present of mugs illustrated the clear family ranking order chez Aplin’s – Mr Right & Mrs Always Right – though we may have our suspicions as to where the family dogs are in the ranking order.

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David’s chat and his sermon on Matthew 16 vv 13-20 focused on the rock foundation of the church – something God has provided. Although it might appear that the church had lost its way in society, he believed it remained relevant for us all – and still growing world-wide. It provided a base that secular fashions of today could not provide.

Covid-19 had forced us to accept changes in the way we worshipped, and the Zoom format allowed people to be with us digitally, who could not be with us physically in church. This was something to be treasured and sustained as we moved forward, to spread the church from the building to the community. Zoom and the Holy Spirit will spread the vital aspect of fellowship amongst us all.

Family communion Service – 16th August – led by Mike Findley.

This was Mike’s first Zoom Service for us and we thank him for leading our worship even though he finds the lack of direct audience feedback with Zoom a little troubling.

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Mike’s theme, based on the two readings; Isaiah 56 v1, & 6-8 and Matthew 15 v 7-20 was the approach to returning to or rebuilding religious life – whether to look outward or inward.

Isiah gave advice to the Jews returning from exile to Jerusalem to look outwards, but Mike felt that the later prophets had encouraged the Jews to look inwards and concentrate on being closed community bound by ever more detailed rules. Jesus in Matthew’s Gospel aptly nailed this mis-step.

As we contemplate “new normal” and a possible return to a physical presence in our church Mike encouraged us to be outward looking, open and welcoming to new ideas and diversity. He reminded us that God would never ask us to do things that we could not with his help achieve.

Family Zoom Service – 9th August – led by Anne Walton.

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Anne’s Service this week focused on Matthew 14:22-33, “Jesus walks on the Water”. Life was not without risks – as we found trying to integrate “Virtual Stephen” into the day’s live Service.

Being a Christian brought its own risks, but was a life without risk a life worth living? A strong faith and leaning into God in times of difficulty would see us through our lives of living and sharing Jesus’s message with others.

A realist, as ever, Anne noted that for those of us without the faith and belief of Peter, if we were going to try to walk on water it was good to know where the steppingstones were!

Family Zoom Communion Service – 2nd August – led by Anne Walton.

Another enjoyable Communion Service from Anne.

Her Sermon focused on Compassion and Jesus teaching his disciples – learning on the job – about their (and our) responsibilities to look after other people. The sharing of a meal also looked forward to the last supper – something we were to remember in the Eucharist that was to follow.

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It was later suggested that Anne (who now misses her Sunday morning breakfast on the way to Potters Bar from Milton Keynes) might have used a croissant for Communion.

In a similar vein we can observe from last week that Tony Alderman is still on track to get his wish granted – just one more match (The Bees will play Fulham at Wembley on Tuesday for a place in the Premier League).

We were also able to sing (if sing is the right word?) Happy Birthday to Noah in Zambia, who was celebrating his 38th birthday.

Family Zoom Service – 26th July – led by Tony Alderman

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A bittersweet morning.

Tony Alderman led our worship, but against the backdrop of the news that our Church Secretary had become ill and needed to step back from his role. Tony assured us of support and good wishes from the Synod Executive as well as other friends and told us to take courage and find some hidden treasures amongst our membership to continue to take us forward.

It being Tony, his chat on “dreams” had to include the fortunes of Brentford – relegated 73 years ago – now on the cusp of promotion back to the Premiership, but needing just a few more points. In the case of Solomon (1 Kings 3 vv 5-12), when God offered him anything in the world, he chose wisdom and that Tony felt was the challenge for us – what would we do.

(Listening to Tony again, I got the feeling that he just might opt for seeing Brentford in the Premiership over the gift of wisdom – he seemed to have plenty of that anyway!)

In his sermon he started with the words from the first hymn “Don’t worry what you have to say, don’t worry because on that day, God’s spirit will speak in your heart, will speak in your heart.

The readings from Matthew were the parables about the Kingdom. “Cometh the need, cometh the hour” and we should be looking for those hidden talents in our community. We had a responsibility to carry on as an Eldership, not necessarily always to agree but to take care to understand the other persons’ points of view as we moved forward.

We also received words of encouragement from friends who have shared recent Zoom Services with us.

Zoom Communion Service – 19th July – led by Revd. John Steele

A big thankyou to John, leading his first Zoom Service with us – and Communion too!

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The theme was dreams (Abba, not the Rolling Stones this week), something we experience each in our unique way.

The readings from Genesis covered Jacob acquiring Esau’s rights as firstborn in exchange for a bowl of soup (perhaps not a very nice brother?), missing out the deceit of his father to get Esau’s final  blessing and being forced to flee, but going forward to Jacob’s Dream at Bethel.

John saw some similarities between Jacob and us: we also try to flee from God at times, we have a promise from God and the responsibilities that go with it.

During the Covid-19 Lockdown, our Bethel has been our own homes and we’ve seen the work of “two footed angels” – all our health and caring services – around us. As we slowly come out of Lockdown, John hoped we would see other examples of the stairway, examples of Gods direct workings amongst us and rejoice.

Family zoom Service – 12th July – led by our Elders

This Sunday was another opportunity for our Elders to provide “team worship”, with Tony Corfe as team leader. I think they passed the test.

Tony took the New Testament reading  Matthew 12 vv 1-9, 18-23, “The Parable of the Sower” for his message. He took us through a variety of possible interpretations about farming methods and soil quality – what kind of ground are we? – before taking us back to the title of the passage.

In his view it is all about the Sower – God – and the seed – his Word. Unlike a farmer, because of his love for us he sows the seed on all types of ground – and Tony felt there was a bit of all types of ground in all of our hearts – as a gesture of his wildly extravagant love for us. And if some of the seed finds even the smallest portion of good soil within our hearts, he nurtures the Kingdom within us.

Family Zoom Communion Service – 5th July, led by Revd. David Aplin

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David certainly offered us some food for thought.

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If you can get away from daytime TV (a bit of a struggle for David, based on his comments), Lockdown can be a time for introspection and getting rid of some of the “baggage” of our lives. We need to be challenged and to grow from the challenge; be willing to accept change and have an understanding relevant “for now”.
Arrogance and conceit are a barrier to God: we should be thankful for his love. If there is a gulf to God, there is often a gulf to other people in our lives. So it’s time for us to examine who we are and what really matters to us; to ask “Lord, what will you have me do?”
Jesus says, “Come to me and I will give you rest”.
In Lockdown many of us are dependent on others and feel a lack of “wholeness” because we cannot do many of the things we used to. We give ourselves to the generosity of those who offer to help us, giving up some of that desire to be independent – and so it can be with God.
This is not to be totally dependent, but to know He’s here for us. And maybe by depending on others during Lockdown we’ve learnt a little more about our relationship with God and how to “lean on him”.

Family Zoom Service – 28th June, led by Tony Alderman 

A great pleasure to have Tony Alderman to lead our worship – broadcasting from the BBC (Barnet Broom Cupboard), after a spell “at Her Majesty’s Pleasure” in the Royal Free Hospital.

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Tony returned home with all body parts and his sense of humour intact and functioning. He enjoyed his first meal at home of lamb and mint sauce, reflecting that he’d been looked after by a Mr Lamb and a Ms Myint – taking us into “What’s in a name?”.
In answer to “What is a Christian?”, his theme was welcome. Hospitality, however small, was a sign of God’s presence. It’s the welcome you give that marks you out as a Christian and sometimes we in our churches forget the importance of making people welcome.

Family Zoom Service and Holy Communion – 21st June, led by Anne Walton 

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Anne’s service confronted us with a very difficult Bible passage – Matthew 10, vv 24 to 39. Taking us into it gently, Anne started with triangles and plenty of visual aids, before we heard the Bible reading and Anne’s thoughts on it, latter using the theme of Love Triangles. Mostly used in the context of two people in competition for the love of a third, who loves both, it was more difficult to visualise in the context of love for Jesus and for one’s family. From Matthew, Jesus appears to be demanding that we prioritise love for him above all others. Anne believes that our love for Jesus (and God) enrichens our love for our families and friends. A priority yes, but not a competition.

Family Zoom Service – 14th June, led by Canon Richard Osborn 

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Richard talked to us about life during “Lockdown”.

The Bible reading Matthew 9 v 35 to Matthew 10 v 8 sparked a comment on the difference between pity (GNB) and compassion (in Richard’s version) which he felt was a more appropriate word. Jesus whilst controversial, stood out by being a teacher, a prophet and a healer and for his compassion for the crowds that followed him.
When Jesus called together his Disciples and sent them out as his Apostles it was with the same motivation – something that he felt carries over to us today as we share his message with others. 

Holy Trinity Service – 7th June, led by Revd. David Aplin

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Another enjoyable service with up to 29 “log-ins”.

 In David’s talk and Sermon he shared with us his understanding and conception of the Trinity (it being Trinity Sunday). Although he was inclined to see all three elements as distinct persons, there was no hierarchy involved. David has experienced the working of the Holy Spirit on numerous occasions.

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Nice to have Paula Jones slightly more into the field of view this week – and the little vocal excursions were delightful!

Pentecost Service – 31st May, led by Tony Alderman

We welcomed Tony back to his second Zoom Service with us. He chatted about Lockdown, with the inevitable (golfing) joke.

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It being Pentecost, the reading and the Sermon dealt with the coming of the Holy Spirit – something Tony felt was as true for us today as for the disciples at that time. Tony is involved with education and a care home charity. He highlighted some inequalities and encouraged us to do what we can to help address failings or gaps in provision – covid-19 testing in a care home being an example of a successful intervention.
We welcomed two newcomers to our Service and the Chat session – Nkosingibhile Dlamini, who we met some years ago when he visited Potters Bar for a Scout Jamboree,

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and Katherine (Kate) Arnold a former member of the church now living in the New Forest. Kate said “It was nice to be able to put faces to names. Also being able to see Margaret Barton again and Paula and Steven. By the way, can you tell Paula, I love her ginger cat”.

Meanwhile John Knott was in telephone contact with his mother Joan, to help her log in and activate her sound – which she finally did. We sang her a typically chaotic Happy Birthday at the end of the service in case she had missed the professional version (Stephen Jones) at the start.

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Ascencion Service – 24th May, led by Anne Walton

Another good day with 30 “log-ins” this time – church members and friends near and far. We’d hoped to have Revd. Kenneth Bamuleke from Uganda giving us the prayers, but he could not get internet access and so Tony Corfe read his prayers for him.

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Anne’s Theme for Ascension Sunday was Goodbyes and New Beginnings – for the Disciples and for us. Lots to be joyful for and tell people about! The card says ‘Let your faith be bigger than your fear’.

We managed to ambush Stephen Jones trying to sneak a birthday past us so he was forced to play and sing “Happy birthday to ME!”

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The edited Service follows:

Family Zoom Service with Holy Communion – 17th May, led by Revd. John Mackerness 

Some problems with Zoom software for this Sunday Service, with a number of people unable to join or left without microphone or video stream. Hopefully Zoom will have solved this by next weekend. A number of other churches had problems with their Services.

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This said we pushed on and John Mackrness led our worship and Holy Communion. The reading from Acts had Paul in Athens taking his mission to the Athenians. John felt Paul was giving us a masterclass in outreach, noting that our current situation with Covid-19 should not stop our mission to share the Christian message of hope in these troubled times.

We were pleased to see some new (to Zoom) faces, but were frustrated that some who had really persevered were not able to enjoy the full experience of a Zoom Service.

We wished David Morris a very Happy Birthday – in church?

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Our usual duet for hymns gained a third voice?

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The edited Service follows:

Family Zoom Service – 10th May, led by Revd. David Aplin 

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An enjoyable Service from David, with plenty of chat before and after the Service and some close friends of David joining us to experience a Zoom service. Although the live Service was fine, the recording had big problems with synchronisation of sound and video streams, so the video stream in the recording below has a few gaps.

Zoom Service including Holy Communion – 3rd May 2020, led by John Wainright 

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Twenty five people logged in, of which four (Audrey Ward, Jean Morse, Marion Poulton & Pam Perrot) phoned in. We were probably over thirty in total – and that’s not counting all Noah’s family, who joined us from Zambia!

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Margaret Barton and Mary Deller logged in without assistance – and celebrated their success.
Lots of chat before and after the service as usual but this time edited out!

You can view and edited version of the Service below.

Third Zoom Service – 26th April 2020, led by Tony Alderman.

Our third Zoom Service led by Tony Alderman was well attended. We welcomed Jennifer Cameron (now living in Ware) to her first Zoom Service. We also had Jean Morse joining us by telephone – the first of our members without internet access to do so. She was very pleased to hear the Service and the sound was clear as a bell! Hopefully others of our members without internet access will join us in the coming weeks.

The reading and Tony’s sermon was based on Luke 24, vv 13-35, The Walk to Emmaus. “Moments of Revelation” linked to a vignette in Tony’s past and his experience of many discrete moments of revelation in his faith journey that came together to build his belief.

As usual, Stephen Jones provided the music and he and his wife Paula sang he hymns for us. We are so grateful to all who produced the service for us.

Second Zoom Service 19th April 2020

Our second Sunday Service on Zoom was notable for the number of new members joining in but it was not as ‘slick’ as the first service, with a few unplanned insertions and some lapses in microphone protocols. These are largely cut from the edited video below.

We all have to learn to keep our microphone muted unless we are asked to make a specific contribution during the service. Also even during the chat sessions before and after the Service, we have to take care not to talk over others. Zoom tends to prioritise he or she who speaks loudest and cut the video and audio from anyone else – sometimes mid-sentence!

A thing that is really great is the interactions – seeing the faces and following the questions and answers about how other members and friends are doing, keeping us all up to date. We even had a member of our sister church in Katombora, Zambia and his family join us!

Easter Sunday Service 12th April 2020

Our first attempt at a Sunday Service on Zoom went better than expected, though there were a few glitches  – like Janet Green’s Internet going down as she was about to present the Intercessionary Prayers – but we came through it to have a thoroughly enjoyable time of worship. Anne Walton was our worship leader and Holy Communion was led by Tony Corfe (we all had bread and wine ready at home).

As you’ll see it was a genuine community effort with many individual contributions. We are particularly luck to have Stephen & Paula Jones providing live music and vocals. We did try community singing in a dry run, but because of synchronising difficulties it was utter chaos. Also everyone has to remember to mute their microphones during he service, so they don’t intrude on the video stream.

The video clip below gives you a flavour of the service, also of the personal interactions as we prepared for the service and chatted after it. No coffee unless you had made it at home however!

You’ll see that Zoom sometimes loses synchronisation between sound and picture, which occasionally leaves gaps in the video footage – but it’s something we can live with – I hope?

We had lots of congratulatory e-mails from those who logged in to Zoom and could participate in the service.

We hope many more members and friends with Internet access will join us in the services we intend to hold in the coming weeks.

Sunday 22nd March – A “Last Hurrah”

This was the last Sunday service to be held in our church for some time as we take measures to slow the spread of the Covid-19 virus.

Our planned worship leader Nick Alexander and our Director of Music Stephen Jones were both unable to be present at the service as their partners are at a higher risk from infection. Stephen recorded the hymn music for us at home (and it was perhaps good that he wasn’t there to hear the singing!).

With many of our church members in the 70+ cohort, most decided not to come to the service, so we were a small group, well spaced out. The service itself was pretty ad-hoc, with our Church Secretary, David Ramsay, leading worship. It was nonetheless an enjoyable worship experience for those who attended.

We concluded that holding services in the church was not a sensible way forward. We are going to look at developing an on-line form of service using Zoom software. Once we have something up and running we’ll let everyone know.

Sunday 15th March – Communion Service led by Fredwyn Hosier

As usual, Fredwyn had a surprise for us. She shared the running of the Service with her Grandson Luca. And Luca was to tell us about the Gruffalo, and later, the Gruffalo’s Child.

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The theme was about fear and facing fear with God’s help  – most appropriate for a day when many of us may be looking forward to a long period of self-isolation and uncertainty.

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Mary Cook also had a story to tell about the importance of an emergency call unit if you are living alone.

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And Tony had a prayer from the minister of the Church in Canada where he and Barbara worship when they are over there.

We don’t know yet when (or if) we may need to close the church for Sunday Services. It appears churches in some countries are doing this. We await Government advice. This week’s video clip is longer than usual because for the first time it includes Holy Communion.

Our Organist this week was Jonathan Gregory.

If you were unable to come to church today, you may want to watch the video clip – and Luca, a little star!

Sunday 8th March – Family Service led by Canon Richard Osborn.

Another memorable Sunday.

If Richard Osborn thought he could sneak a secret birthday past us – he had another think coming. Our spies are everywhere. And he’s still just a ‘stripling’, with a couple of years to go before he gets his bus pass!

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Richard read us Psalm 121 whose writer’s message is about God as provider of help and comfort. The importance of help and care for one another, in church and in our community, was particularly relevant for a day when we were to dedicate our defibrillator after the service.

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Geoff Peterson read John 3, vv 1-17 which tells us about Jesus and Nicodemus – the latter a “fleeting actor”, a Pharisee who wanted to know more, who came to understand that “believing is seeing” – seeing life in a completely different way – is to be born again.

Hertfordshire County Councillor John Graham and his wife attended the service as did Teresa Travell from the Potters Bar Society and Mark Herbert.

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John Graham had given us a contribution of £569 from his Locality Budget towards the Defibrillator – facilitated by the Potters Bar Society – and Mark had installed it for us at his own expense.

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We were joined for the Dedication by Arline and David Hursey, founders of the charity Defibrillators in Public Places (DIPPs), who had provided the Defirillator.

After the dedication by Richard, our church Secretary, David Ramsay, presented Arline with a cheque for £1200, raised by the church through donations at charity lunches and a number of events, including the very successful Quorum Singers pre-Christmas Concert  “On Christmas Night” on 14th December.

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We were pleased to know that the contribution from County and the monies we raised had covered the cost of the defibrillator, with a surplus going towards funding another unit elsewhere.

Sunday 1st March – Family Service led by John Wainright

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John’s theme was Lent, the “testing” of Jesus in the desert  – Matthew 4, vv 1-11 (read by Frank Palmer) – and some ideas for us as we go through the Lent period.

Sunday 23rd February – Family Service led by Revd. John Steele

John’s Themes were about transformation and transfiguration – 2 Corinthians 4, vv 3-6 and Matthew 17, vv 1-9 (read by Janet O’Connor).

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We started with the “Ugly Duckling” , then God’s Glory as seen in Jesus (1) – as seen by us and through us (2) – and as seeing our world through different eyes (3).

Sunday 16th February – Family Service and Holy Communion, led by Revd. Carole Elphick

A new chuch layout for Communion and an old friend back to lead our worship.

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Carole’s reflections were on the decisions we must make – not the least of which was the colour of scarf to wear!

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The real meat of her reflections on the readings from Deuteronomy 30, vv 15-20 and Matthew 5, vv 21-37 (read by Jean Morse) is in the video clip below.

Sunday 9th February – Family Service led by Tony Alderman – 11.00.

It was really great to have Tony back to lead our worship after his latest brush with the NHS. Their attempts to lose him in the system (somewhere between UCH and Royal Free) would be a fine “Patient Story” for our NHS Commissioners to reflect on. For us, as  “Patient, patient Mark 2” , they were great comedy – vintage Tony!

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Having, as usual, found a message for us in his experiences, Tony went on to share with us his thoughts  – “Taught by the spirit” – on the three Bible readings. Kathy Howe read Isaiah 58, vv 1-12, Tony 1 Corinthians 2, vv 1-16 and then Kathy finished up with Matthew 5, vv 13-20,

With Storm Ciara in full flow we were a little light on attendance. If you would like to hear or re-live Tony’s gems, click on the video clip below.

Sunday 2nd February – Family Service led by Dr Geoffrey Peterson

Geoff continued his recounting of Jesus’s early life and Baptism in this 4th week of Epiphany.  His insights on the Beatitudes (Matthew 5) formed the second part of his address.

Christine Emanuel was in church today – a very welcome visit, but tinged with sadness as her Moravian church has recently had a fire and they are currently worshipping in a hall.

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Mike Findley – 26th January

Mike gave us his thoughts on Jesus’scalling of his first disciples (Matthew 4) and “The wisdom of the Cross” (1 Corinthians 1).

Fredwyn Hosier – 15-12-19

An inspirational pre-Christmas message from Fredwyn.

Anne Walton – 8-12-19

Tony Alderman – 1-12-19

David Aplin  – 24-11-19

Mike Findley – 17-11-19

Remembrance Sunday 10-11-19

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my world, my universe.
Amen

Fredwyn Hosier – 3-11-19

Fredwyn shared her thoughts on the lectionary readings of Habakkuk and Luke 19 (The Tax Collector) – which were read by Marion Poulton.

 

Baptism of Isabella Ford 13-10-19 

We were delighted to have a very full church again for Isabella’s Baptism Service, led by Anne Walton. Anne did her “magic water” demonstration and children demonstrated their faith in Anne by passing under the upturned glass. The address reflected on Jesus’s Baptism, in preparation for Isabella’s.

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To see scenes from the Service, click below.

Esther Krakue comes into Membership 18-8-19

Today we welcomed Esther into membership of our church at a Communion Service led by Revd Dr Nick Brindley.

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We were joined by our friends from Brookmans Park URC and were also very pleased to have Rosemary Sargeant and members of her family with us.

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Nick and David Ramsay, our Church Secretary, welcome Esther.

Sunday 28th July 2019 

A very special Sunday, with the return of (Revd) Jeanne Ennals – looking as sprightly as ever after her hip operation – to lead worship.

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We were also so pleased to see Rosemary Sargeant, brought in by her relations for some spiritual food, before going off to the Admiral Byng to feed the body.

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There was a lot to catch up on, both before and after the service – so much so that we ran out of coffee. And that’s something we never do!
With so many people to talk to, Jeanne was (almost) the last person to leave – with our duty officer waving her keys (a put-up job of course).

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Jeanne will be back with us on the 15th September.
It was a very moving service, so if you’d like to relive it, please click on the triangle in the image below.

Sunday 16th June 2019 

Today we welcomed Ali Araghi into membership following his recent Baptism.

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Nick’s sermon was about the Holy Trinity.

Sunday 9th June 

A bittersweet moment this week as our Minister Nick told us that he could no longer sustain the full-time workload of serving two churches and would focus his reduced working hours on our sister Church in Brookmans Park.

Following Nick’s serious illness, he and his wife Pam showed amazing courage and perseverance in the recovery period and we followed with joy each new step along that journey. We now know that the ambition to return to full-time leadership of our two churches has placed a heavy load on them both and is now negatively affecting Nick’s health. In short, he is exhausted.

We pray that this move will provide a rewarding and sustainable future for them both.

Sunday 2nd June.

We were doubly blessed this Sunday. Our choir could postpone their rendering of “Oh for a closer walk with God” no longer – despite their misgivings – and it turned out fine!
We welcomed back Carole Elphick a long-time friend and the day’s worship leader. Carol’s sermons always have those quirky bits – her children describing Jesus’s ascension as the “blast off”……….

2nd June 2019 (3).Movie_Snapshot

………. and those feet up in the ceiling of some churches, reminding those below that he’s up there somewhere.

2nd June 2019 (4).Movie_Snapshot
The choral piece and Carole’s sermon are to be enjoyed (again?) below.

Baptism Service for Ali Araghe – Sunday 26th May 2019

A very special Sunday evening.

Ali Araghe – probably better known to us as Mosayeb Areghi’s nephew – who had supported his Uncle as he came into membership, had asked for a full Baptism before he too came into membership of our Church.
A full immersion is Baptism is not on offer at our church, but fortunately our Minister Nick and his good friends Joel Mercer and Roger Taylor had a solution. We could all attend the evening service at the Potters Bar Baptist Church and Ali could have a full immersion Baptism – and so it was on Sunday the 26th May.
Unfortunately, Joel was ill that evening, so Roger agreed to do what he called the “wet part”, leaving Nick to conduct the joint Service with our friends at Potters Bar Baptist Church. For those of us who had never experienced a full immersion Baptism this was a great new experience as well as a very moving Service.

Ali's Baptism (10).Movie_Snapshot
Ali was supported by Tony Corfe, one of our Elders, who also did the “wet part” – probably a “first” for Tony as well.

Ali's Baptism (15).Movie_Snapshot

Ali's Baptism (19).Movie_Snapshot

Ali's Baptism (23).Movie_Snapshot

We are now looking forward to welcoming Ali into membership in a second Service at our Church.

Ali's Baptism (2).Movie_Snapshot

If you’d like to see more, please click on the triangle below to see highlights of the Service.

 

 

 

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